Wildflowers bloom in the Sierra Nevada
Wildflowers bloom in the Sierra Nevada
County Home => Washoe County => Outreach => Outreach Details

The Washoe County Health District confirms that mosquitos caught in nine traps set in the Gerlach area in northern Washoe County have tested positive for West Nile Virus (WNV), the second positive identification of WNV in Washoe County in 2014.
Media Release
For Immediate Release
http://www.washoecounty.us/health
Contact: Phil Ulibarri
775-328-2414
2014-21

The Washoe County Health District confirms that mosquitos caught in nine traps set in the Gerlach area in northern Washoe County have tested positive for West Nile Virus (WNV), the second positive identification of WNV in Washoe County in 2014. According to health officials the Gerlach General Improvement District is responsible for mosquito control in the Gerlach area, and is expected to conduct fogging treatments beginning this week.

Today’s announcement comes on the heels of the first reported human case of West Nile Virus in the state, a neuroinvasive case reported in Clark County just this morning. State of Nevada health officials are notifying other local health agencies that positive mosquito pools have now been identified in Clark, Washoe, Elko, and Mineral Counties. They advise that with so many positive mosquito pools in multiple counties, additional human cases in the state can be expected.

Washoe County officials encourage everyone to reduce contact with mosquitos by taking precautionary measures, including:

  • Mosquitoes bite in the early morning and evening so it is important to wear proper clothing and repellent containing DEET, picaradin, oil of lemon eucalyptus or IR3535 according to label instructions. Repellents keep the mosquitoes from biting you. DEET can be used safely on infants and children 2 months of age and older.
  • Remove standing water from around their homes. Any area can become a problem and a potential breeding-ground, including small puddles, pools, planters, children’s sandboxes, wagons or toys, underneath and around faucets, as well as plant saucers and pet bowls. Anything that can hold even a capful of water can give mosquitos the space they need to survive.
  • Make sure that your doors and windows have tight-fitting screens to keep mosquitoes out. Repair or replace screens with tears or holes; and,
  • Vaccinate your horses for WNV.

The Washoe County Health District’s Communicable Disease Program investigates all reported cases of diseases like WNV and presents those cases in the Communicable Disease Weekly Report. Residents may report night-time mosquito activity to the Health District at 328-2434 and 785-4599.

More information on WNV and the Washoe County Health District’s Vector-Borne Disease Prevention Program can be found at www.washoecounty.us/health/ehs/vbdp.html.

# # #