The Wilbur D. May Museum at Rancho San Rafael has a wide range of historic artifacts
The Wilbur D. May Museum at Rancho San Rafael has a wide range of historic artifacts
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Properly preparing and handling foods can assure us all safe meals every day of the year, but especially during the holidays. Here are some simple, easy-to-remember food safety tips:
  • Wash hands with soap and warm water before and after food preparation, and especially after handling raw foods; 
  • Clean all work surfaces, utensils, and dishes with hot soapy water, and rinse with hot water after each use;
  • Be sure to cook foods thoroughly. For a turkey, that means cooking the bird to a minimum internal temperature of 165°F or above to ensure safety; and,
  • When dealing with leftovers, turkey should be refrigerated one of two ways:  within two hours after it is cooked; or right after cooking, the turkey should be de-boned, sliced, or pulled into pieces no more than 2 1/2 inches thick and refrigerated in shallow containers. 
Media Release
For Immediate Release
http://www.washoecounty.us/health
Contact: Phil Ulibarri
775-328-2414
2011-33
Properly preparing and handling foods can assure us all safe meals every day of the year, but especially during the holidays. Here are some simple, easy-to-remember food safety tips:
  • Wash hands with soap and warm water before and after food preparation, and especially after handling raw foods;
  • Clean all work surfaces, utensils, and dishes with hot soapy water, and rinse with hot water after each use;
  • Be sure to cook foods thoroughly. For a turkey, that means cooking the bird to a minimum internal temperature of 165°F or above to ensure safety; and,
  • When dealing with leftovers, turkey should be refrigerated one of two ways: within two hours after it is cooked; or right after cooking, the turkey should be de-boned, sliced, or pulled into pieces no more than 2 1/2 inches thick and refrigerated in shallow containers.
According to Bob Sack, Environmental Health Services Division Director at the Washoe County Health District, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 48 million illnesses, 128,000 hospitalizations, and 3,000 deaths annually in the United States are related to foodborne diseases. Bacteria such as Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 are responsible for many foodborne illnesses, caused by eating contaminated foods. Contamination usually occurs as a result of poor food handling practices at the farms, factories, restaurants, or homes.

  Symptoms of foodborne disease include fever, abdominal cramps, and diarrhea which may be bloody. Most infected people recover from foodborne illnesses within a week. Some, however, may develop complications that require hospitalization. Young children, the elderly, pregnant women, and persons with a weakened immune system are at highest risk for potentially life-threatening complications.   Practicing good food safety rules will help ensure a safe and happy holiday season. For more information, visit to Food Services at www.washoecounty.us/health .